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Spectacular Drone Video Footage - Maasai Mara Wildebeest Migration

Last year, I embarked on an unforgettable 19 000km adventure that will stay with me for a very long time. I crossed the African continent alone on a motorcycle. The journey took about 6 months, as I took my time to learn more about the 15 African countries I was travelling through .





I tried to help where I could, particularly with charities for children and wildlife conservation. I also captured many images, many of which are on the Facebook page of Two Wheels Across and documented the entire journey in videos for my Youtube channel.









One of the exciting parts of my adventure was Casper the friendly drone, a Quadcopter that I used as often as I could to capture the beauty of Africa from the air.





I am excited to share one of the videos I filmed with you. I was fortunate to be in Kenya’s Maasai Mara during the migration and I captured the river crossing from the air. I also danced with an elephant, ran with wildebeests and kept three lions company for a few minutes. I hope you will enjoy…

SpaceX Rocket Science for Beginners

SpaceX has a new rocket... Its called the Bird 9...




Imgur.com

Satellite Image - The Nile Illuminated at Night

acquired October 28, 2010download large image (606 KB, JPEG, 1440x960) One of the fascinating aspects of viewing Earth at night is how well the lights show the distribution of people. In this view of Egypt, we see a population almost completely concentrated along the Nile Valley, just a small percentage of the country’s land area.
The Nile River and its delta look like a brilliant, long-stemmed flower in this astronaut photograph of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the International Space Station. The Cairo metropolitan area forms a particularly bright base of the flower. The smaller cities and towns within the Nile Delta tend to be hard to see amidst the dense agricultural vegetation during the day. However, these settled areas and the connecting roads between them become clearly visible at night. Likewise, urbanized regions and infrastructure along the Nile River becomes apparent (see also The Great Bend of Nile, Day & Night.)
Another brightly lit region is vis…

A History of the Landsat Science Satellite

Landsat 1 • Landsat 2 • Landsat 3 • Landsat 4 • Landsat 5 • Landsat 6 • Landsat 7 • Landsat 8
From the Beginning “The Landsat program was created in the United States in the heady scientific and exploratory times associated with taming the atom and going to the Moon,” explains Dr. John Barker. In fact, it was the Apollo Moon-bound missions that inspired the Landsat program. During the early test bed missions for Apollo, photographs of Earth’s land surface from space were taken for the first time.






“This photography has been documented as the stimulus for Landsat,” explains Dr. Paul Lowman, who proposed the terrain photography experiment for the last two Mercury missions, the Gemini missions, and the Apollo 7 and 9 missions.



Thor-Delta rocket prepared to launch Landsat 1, 1972.
In 1965, director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), William Pecora, proposed the idea of a remote sensing satellite program to gather facts about the natural resources of our planet. Pecora stated that the pr…